The Environics, Inc. Post

Air Pollution : Ammonia and Hydrogen Sulfide and Ambient Calibration

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Tue, Sep 10, 2019 @ 10:45 AM

The most common air pollutants include carbon monoxide, ground level ozone, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compounds. There are other pollutants that are important both due to their impact on the environment and on public health. We will take a look at two such pollutants, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

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Tags: gas mixing, Ambient Air calibration, gas dilution

Top 5 Maintenance Tips from our Service Department

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Thu, Jan 11, 2018 @ 10:22 AM

We often receive calls and emails asking about the best way to maintain our mixers and dilutors. There are several important things that you can do to keep your unit running in top shape. They will also help you extend the life of your unit.

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Tags: Environics Inc, gas mixing, Ambient Air calibration, zero air generator, customer focus, Troubleshooting, troubleshooting6100, troubleshooting6103, Series 4040, Series 4020, Series 4000

Custom System Focus - Explosive Gas Mixing and Dilution

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Thu, Sep 04, 2014 @ 02:24 PM

At Environics, all of our units are custom built for our customers' specific needs.  Customers who need to dilute/mix explosive gases often come to us for help creating highly specialized systems. Most often, this is in order to calibrate gas detectors or for research or calibration purposes.  To meet these unique needs, Environics designed a modified version of our Series 4040 gas dilution system which included a dual chassis design.

The electronics enclosure includes the power supply and PC boards for controlling the Mass Flow Controllers (MFC) and direct acting solenoid valves in the second enclosure. The electronics enclosure connects to a computer via a 9 pin serial port connector and cable. The 4040 software, on the computer, communicates with the microcomputer board inside the electronics enclosure.

The second enclosure is sealed and houses the MFCs, valves and components to support the enclosure purge. A continuous purge flows through the enclosure while it is running. This serves two purposes. The first is to carry out heat built up by the internal components. The second is to dilute any potential leaks that may develop. The gas plumbing inside this enclosure was vacuum leak tested to 1X10-8 ATM CC/SEC He.

In addition to continuous purge flow, the enclosure is pressurized to approximately 5” H20 while running the enclosure purge. This provides and indicator that the purge is activated as well as preventing any air leaks into the enclosure from outside. A safety vent was  added to vent the enclosure to atmosphere if the pressure inside the enclosure reaches 20” H20. This could happen if for some reason the purge vent becomes blocked or the pressure on the purge rotameter is too high.

The two enclosures are connected electrically via two control cables labeled MFCs and VALVES. An earth ground wire is connected from the electronics chassis to the aluminum mounting plate inside the purged enclosure. This safely discharges any static electricity that can build up in a system with flow.

Have a similar need or need help with another unique set of conditions?  You can contact us at (860) 872-1111 or here for more information.

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Tags: Environics Inc, gas mixing, gas dilution, calibration, customer focus, explosive gas mixing, custom gas mixing system

Update from Our Customer Service Department

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Fri, Apr 04, 2014 @ 10:02 AM

As most of you know, last week marked the last day for our long-time Service Manager, Paul.  After 22 years with Environics, he is moving and starting a new chapter in his life.  We will all miss him and wish him the very best!

With service on our minds, I bring to you today a few of the more commonly asked questions from our customers.  If you have a question, you can always reach us via our website, email or by phone.

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Tags: Environics Inc, ozone, gas mixing, gas mixer, ozone generator, Profile

Environics Around the Globe

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Thu, Apr 03, 2014 @ 01:31 PM

As a US-based company, we are often asked where we ship internationally.  Both direct and through distributors and reps, we sell worldwide.  

Here is a map of the locations our units have shipped from us over the past few years (the blue pointers are our distributors).

Are you using an Environics system in a location that isn't marked?  Let us know so we can add you to the map!

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Tags: Environics Inc, gas mixing, Zero Air, customer focus

Throwback to 1988

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Mon, Nov 11, 2013 @ 09:51 AM

Just for fun, here is a look at an ad from 1988, when Environics was just 2 years old.  It features our discontinued Series 200, which was replaced by our Series 2000 and Series 4000 gas mixers.

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Tags: Environics Inc, gas mixing, gas mixer

Customer Focus - Working with High Concentrations of Explosive Gases

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Wed, Oct 09, 2013 @ 09:40 AM

Often, customers come to us looking for a gas flow management system to fit a very particular set of criteria.  In some cases, this requires just minor customization of a current Environics model.  In other cases, a completely unique design is required.  Today, I share with you one interesting example.  Although I focus on the first system we designed, we have since made similar systems for other customers whose needs parallel these.

Our customer needed to dilute explosive gases at high concentrations in order to calibrate gas detectors.  After working with our sales and engineering teams, we designed and built a modified version of our Series 4040 gas dilution system which included a dual chassis design.

The electronics enclosure includes the power supply and PC boards for controlling the Mass Flow Controllers (MFC) and direct acting solenoid valves in the second enclosure. The electronics enclosure connects to a computer via a 9 pin serial port connector and cable. The 4040 software, on the computer, communicates with the microcomputer board inside the electronics enclosure.


The second enclosure is sealed and houses the MFCs, valves and components to support the enclosure purge. A continuous purge flows through the enclosure while it is running. This serves two purposes. The first is to carry out heat built up by the internal components. The second is to dilute any potential leaks that may develop. The gas plumbing inside this enclosure was vacuum leak tested to 1X10-8 ATM CC/SEC He.

In addition to continuous purge flow, the enclosure is pressurized to approximately 5” H20 while running the enclosure purge. This provides and indicator that the purge is activated as well as preventing any air leaks into the enclosure from outside. A safety vent was  added to vent the enclosure to atmosphere if the pressure inside the enclosure reaches 20” H20. This could happen if for some reason the purge vent becomes blocked or the pressure on the purge rotameter is too high.

The two enclosures are connected electrically via two control cables labeled MFCs and VALVES. An earth ground wire is connected from the electronics chassis to the aluminum mounting plate inside the purged enclosure. This safely discharges any static electricity that can build up in a system with flow.

Have a similar need?  You can contact us at (860) 872-1111 or here for more information.

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Tags: Environics Inc, gas mixing, Gas Flow, gas dilution, customer focus

Customer Focus - Development of a Highly sensitive H2S Gas Sensor

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Fri, Dec 14, 2012 @ 11:25 AM

From time to time, we like to showcase the research of our customers.  Our team is always interested in learning more about the huge variety of research projects and discoveries made in labs using Environics systems.

Recently, we received a note from Ying Wang at the University of Connecticut on a research project utilizing an Environics 4000 gas mixing system. Ying is a member of Dr. Yu Lei's lab in the department of Chemical, Materials & Biomolecular Engineering.  The lab has two main areas of study. First is the development of various (bio)sensors, whose uses range from the diagnosis, drug discovery, screening and food safety, and pollutant monitoring.  Recent work has also involved the detection of biological and chemical agents.  The second focus is the synthesis of nanostructured materials and their application, with the goal of developing new nanomaterials that can be applied to the fields of sensing and biosensing.

A recent paper published in RSC advances, the researchers utilized their Environics system in the fabrication and testing of a sensor device which featured a aligned CuO nanowires capable of H2S detection.  Sensitivity was examined under a variety of conditions, including levels between 10 to 1000 ppb and temperatures from 25 to 420 °C.  The CuO nanowire sensor showed a detection limit of 2.5 ppb and a linear response range of 10 ppb to 100 ppb.

Have an interesting project using your Environics system?  Share it with us and you may be the included in our next focus!

(image source: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2012/RA/c2ra00718e)

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Tags: gas mixing, gas mixer, customer focus, sensor

Hypoxia Training Study - Comparing In-Flight Versus and ROBD Reported Symptoms

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Mon, Dec 12, 2011 @ 01:42 PM

Over the past year, I have written several times about the effects of hypoxia, including a video, which showed not only how hypoxia may present itself, but how the hypoxic person may be oblivious to the effects.  I also shared information regarding the use of the Reduced Oxygen Breathing Device (ROBD2), and how this system is used in military training to allow pilots to better prepare and understand the symptoms of hypoxia.  You can read more here and here.

Today, I wanted to share an interesting study from the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, and the Aviation Survival Training Center, Naval Survival Training Institute, Naval Operational Medicine Institute in Washington.  The researchers were attempting to determine how effectively the ROBD (the earlier version of the ROBD2) reflected the reported symptoms of hypoxia when compared to in-flight occurrences.

The researchers began by surveying 566 aviators with a 20 question, anonymous survey about their flight experiences with hypoxia PRIOR to ROBD training. The survey included basic demographic questions followed by questions regarding in-flight hypoxia symptoms they may have experienced.  For those who responded that they had experienced hypoxic symptoms in flight, additional questions were asked regarding which symptoms they had experienced.

A second group of 156 pilots were surveyed, also anonymously, following ROBD training at a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft (following the Navy's standard training protocols).  Again, the survey included demographic questions as well as questions regarding any symptoms of hypoxia they may have experienced during the training.

Once the data was collected, the results were analyzed using a variety of means (including Chi-square analysis (alpha=0.05), Fischer’s exact test (alpha=0.05), and incident
risk ratios).  I won't review all of the data and analysis, but some of the key findings are reviewed below.

For those surveyed regarding in-flight symptoms:

  • 20% reported hypoxia symptoms at an average altitude of just over 25,000 ft

  • Of those who had experienced in-flight symptoms, over half (57%) were not wearing an oxygen mask when the symptoms started and only 21% reported the experience in naval aviation hazard reports (HAZREPs).

  • The most common symptoms reported were tingling, difficulty concentrating and dizziness.

 When comparing the results of the two surveys, the researchers found:

  • 5 of the 16 symptoms listed on the surveys had statistically significant differences in the reported levels (tingling, difficulty concentrating, air hunger, blurred vision, and lights dimming.

  • For the other 11 of the 16 symptoms, there was NO significant difference between the frequency reported during in-flight experiences and ROBD2 training experiences.

The authors conclude that some of the symptoms differences found may be minimized with some of the updates in the ROBD2, and that additional customization may reduce these still further.  Regardless, they state, "Ultimately, the authors recommend the continued use
of ROBD as an operationally focused and seemingly valid training tool," recommending it be used as part of a total program which includes instruction on both the similarities and potential differences between training symptoms and in-flight symptoms. 

To read the full article, click here (there is a fee for download.  AsMA members have free access). 

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Tags: Environics Inc, gas mixing, Hypoxia, ROBD, pilot training, hypoxia training

Meat Packaging (MAP) Case Study – Food & Beverage Packaging

Posted by Dr. Rachel Stansel on Mon, Oct 24, 2011 @ 10:43 AM


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Tags: Environics Inc, gas mixing, gas mixer, MAP, EMAP, modified atmosphere packaging