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Troubleshooting the Series 6103 - Part 9 - Photometer Issues Continued

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Tue, Apr 25, 2017 @ 10:45 AM

series-6100.jpg

Today, is the final article in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100 and S6103. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up, while Part 2 and Part 3 focused on what to do if you are seeing issues with flow. Part 4 looked at what to do when you were not getting any ozone regardless of the command. Part 5 and Part 6 looked at a variety of ozone issues in the Series 6100 specifically, while Part 7 looked at ozone issues with the Series 6103. Last time, in Part 8, we began to look at photometer related issues in the 6103.

Today, we will wrap up with how to troubleshoot a noisy photometer in a Series 6103.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note!!: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service departmentNEVER unplug the ozone or photometer lamps while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry.

System built after 11/2002 use a chassis with hinged side panels. This allows the side panels to be dropped for troubleshooting purposes. The cable lengths will allow the system to be powered on while the panels are dropped. However, always power down before dropping the panels.

Noisy Photometer

  1. As always, begin by verifying that all of the calibration data is properly entered in the System setup. This includes the ozone calibration, photometer calibration and you ADCs/DACs.
  2. Make sure that external electrical noise is being controlled. If unsure, add a UPS/power conditioner. It is also important to make sure the system cover is on and the screws are secure to create better chassis ground and make the system less susceptible to electrical noise.
  3. Next, be sure that the REFERENCE port pressure is not too high or too low. The optimal pressure is between 20 and 30 PSIG.
  4. Insufficient gas for the photometer will also create noise. The photometer requries 2 LPM. Make sure this 2 LPM is considered when deliverying gas to external analyzers.
  5. Make sure that the photometer lamp (red arrow) is backed out slightly in the block and that the thermistor (blue arrow) is bottomed out. 6103 lamp and thermistor.jpg
  6. Once you have checked these items, make sure that your photometer tube is clean and the glass windows of the photometer assembly are not chipped.The tube can be removed by loosening the knurled knob (blue arrow), which is done by rotating counter clockwise. It is best to use compressed air to clean out the tube.6103 photometer tube.jpgMaking sure the unit is turned off first, you can then visually inspect the glass windows (red arrows) to check for cracks or chips around the edges. Once reassembled, you will want to run the built-in leak test as follows:
    1. Be sure there is a source of gas connected to Port 1 at 25 PSIG.
    2. Select the LEAK function from the Main Menu, and then press START. The software will acquire Atmospheric Pressure, and then prompt for the outputsto be capped.
    1. Cap the Output Manifold, Vent and Exhaust ports. Use the caps supplied with the system.
    1. Press OK. The Leak Test will fill the volume of the system plumbing with gas from Port 1 to 5 PSIA above atmospheric pressure, and use pressure decay to calculate the leak rate. Any leak in excess of the maximum leak specification for the system (3 SCCM) will be displayed.
    2. The final step to troubleshoot is that the pump intact or outlet valves are not sealing properly. This will also cause low photometer readings, as you will have reference gas mixing in with sample gas. To test, place a small amount of restriction on the EXHAUST port (such as a 6" piece of 1/8" tubing). With the photometer loop OFF, in either FLOW or CONC mode, you should see the ozone level significantly drop and become very noisy. This is an indication that the pump intake or outlet valves have become partially blocked. We recommend that the unit be returned to our service department for a tuneup.
If you need further assistance or to order replacement parts, Contact us!

 

I hope you have found these troubleshooting tips helpful! If you have specific topics you would like us to cover, let us know.  Subscribe above so you don't miss a thing!

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6103

Troubleshooting the Series 6103 - Part 8 - Photometer Issues

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Thu, Apr 20, 2017 @ 10:45 AM

series-6100.jpg

Today, is Part 8 in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100 and S6103. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up, while Part 2 and Part 3 focused on what to do if you are seeing issues with flow. Part 4 looked at what to do when you were not getting any ozone regardless of the command. Part 5 and Part 6 looked at a variety of ozone issues in the Series 6100 specifically, while Part 7 looked at ozone issues with the Series 6103.

Today, we will look at how to troubleshoot photometer issues in a Series 6103.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note!!: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service departmentNEVER unplug the ozone or photometer lamps while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry.

System built after 11/2002 use a chassis with hinged side panels. This allows the side panels to be dropped for troubleshooting purposes. The cable lengths will allow the system to be powered on while the panels are dropped. However, always power down before dropping the panels.

No Ozone Detected by the Photometer

  1. First, check that all of the photometer calibration data is properly entered in the System setup.
  2. Make sure that whatever ozone source you are using, whether internal or external, is producing ozone properly and that you have set the unit to read ozone in the external or internal respectively. This can be set by pressing the Menu bottom while in PHOTO/CONC/FLOW modes and using F2 to toggle.6013 Photometer 2.jpg
  3. Next check that the photometer lamp is illuminated. When in photometer mode, if the intensity of the lamp (displayed on the top line) are at or neat zero, your lamp is not on. This could be due to the lamp itself, or an issue with the PC414 or PC415. If a spare lamp is available, you can eliminate the lamp as the source of the problem by swapping them. BE SURE to never power on the unit without a lamp plugged into the PC415. When replacing the lamp, be sure it is backed out slightly to allow for expansion. If the issue is a board, contact us for assistance in repairing or replacing the board.
  4. If your lamp is properly illuminated, check to make sure the pump is enabled and running (for a detailed how to, check out Part 7 of our series here)
  5. If you are in photometer mode and are trying to read external source of ozone,make sure the vented source of ozone is connected to the SAMPLE IN port and zero air is connected to REFERENCE port at 25 PSIG.
  6. Verify that the pump is enabled and running (for a how to, check out Part 7 here).
  7. Check all steady state test points on PC415 are as below (ground = black arrow). PC415 Steady State TPsIn addition, the following TPs should be as follows:
    1. TP5 and 6: gas pressure and temp - approximately 2.45V (for 14.7 PSIA)
    2. TP8: block heater - between 4-5 volts (for temp between 25-50oC)
    3. TP12: block temperature - after warm up, between 4.9-5.1V (49-51oC)PC415 Photometer TP.jpg
  8. The final step to troubleshoot is that the photometer valve V1 or V2 is functioning.With the system power off, disconnect solenoid valve connector between PC401 and V2. Measure the DC resistance of V2. The resistance should be approximately 80 ohms. If resistance is good, PC401 high current driver circuit may be bad or solenoid valve plunger is stuck. We suggest you return the unit for evaluation and tuneup.
6103 solenoid tower.jpg

 

As always, we are happy to assist.

If you need further assistance or to order replacement parts, Contact us!

 

Next time we will wrap up this series with some additional photometer troubleshooting! Subscribe above so you don't miss a thing!

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6103

Troubleshooting the Series 6103 - Part 7 - Ozone Issues

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Mon, Apr 17, 2017 @ 10:45 AM

series-6100.jpg

Today, is Part 7 in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100 and S6103. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up, while Part 2 and Part 3 focused on what to do if you are seeing issues with flow. Part 4 looked at what to do when you were not getting any ozone regardless of the command. Part 5 and Part 6 looked at a variety of ozone issues in the Series 6100 specifically.

Today, we will look at how to troubleshoot ozone issues in a Series 6103.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service department!

 

Ozone is Drifting

  1. Begin by following the same initial steps as you would in a 6100 through step 5 below.
  2. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  3. Make sure all ozone calibration data and ADCs (found in the SYSTEM mode) are valid and consistent with the last calibration.
  4. Verify that the system has warmed up long enough with ozone commanded. Especially when a system is new, the generator may drift up to 30 minutes before stabilizing. If the system is not used on a daily basis, drift will also be more common. We recommends that during the power up period, the system be run with ozone for 30 minutes to 1 hour to help condition the plumbing and burn in the lamp. 
  5. If you are still seeing drift after warm up, it is important to make sure that the ozone block temperature is stable. A drifting block temperature will cause the ozone to drift. The ozone block temperature should be stable between 48 and 51 degrees C and can be monitored on TP15 (yellow) on PC410 (see below). The voltage should be between 4.8 and 5.1 VDC. PC410 TP15.jpg
  6. Make sure that the ozone command is not drifting. This is checked on TP4 on PC410.
  7. Make sure that the ozone command and ozone pressure are not drifting. This is checked on TP4 and TP17on PC410.  TP17 (green TP indicated by the red arrow) is the ozone pressure reading, and TP 4 (blue TP just below and to the right of TP17) is the ozone command.PC410 TP17.jpg
  8. Unlike in a Series 6100, the command voltage is also impacted by pressure correction when the photometer control loop is off. If TP17 is drifting, disable pressure correction by going to PREFS from the ready screen and run again. If the ozone becomes stable, then there is a false indication of pressure drift and the PC410 should be replaced. The ozone would then need to be recalibrated, so we recommend this be done in the factory. You can contact our service department for assistance.
  9. If drift is consistent despite burn in and the above factors being stable, replace the ozone lamp.
  10. Although very uncommon, if a new lamp does not correct the drift either, if the optics have become contaminated by external contaminate (EX. Oil from compressor system), you may need to replace the ozone generator.Contact us for additional assistance, as a new ozone generator will require system recalibration.

 

Ozone is Unstable

  1. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  2. Make sure all ozone calibration data and ADCs (found in the SYSTEM mode) are valid and consistent with the last calibration.
  3. If using the photometer control loop to control the ozone generator, turn the loop OFF. This will help to determine if the issue is being caused by the ozone generator or the photometer. This can be done from within Flow mode. Once flowing, press MENU and use F1 to toggle the O3 CTRL to OFF.6013 Photometer 1.jpg
  4. If the problem persists after turning off the photometer control loop, follow steps 6-8 below.
  5. If the instability goes away when the photometer is disengaged, you will need to troubleshoot the photometer. This is our next topic, and a link will be added once it is live!
  6. As outlined above in step 4 and 5, make sure you block temperature and pressure are stable.
  7. If all data is accurate and your temperature and pressure are stable, we recommend replacing the lamp.
  8. In rare occasions, if a new lamp does not correct the issue, a new PC410 is required. We recommend contacting our service department and having the unit evaluated at the factory to verify this.

Ozone is High and Uncontrolled Regardless of Command

  1. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  2. This can happen if the Photometer control loop is on and the pump is either not activated or engaged. Verify the pump is on and functioning. From the main menu, go to PREFS and then to Photometer Prefs. Confirm both options are enabled. If they are, you will then confirm that the pump was not manually turned off. To do this, go to FLOW mode. Start flow and then press MENU. Verify the Pump is set to AUTO as in the below image, toggling with F3 if needed.
     
    6013 Photometer 2.jpg
  3. If the pump is engaged but still not functioning, can contact our service department for assistance.
  4. If your pump is working correctly, next you would make sure all ozone calibration data (found in the SYSTEM mode) is valid and consistent with the last calibration.
  5. If the data is all accurate, the problem is almost always the PC410 photo detector circuit has failed. The PC410 should be replaced. The ozone would then need to be recalibrated, so we recommend this be done in the factory. You can contact our service department for assistance.

 

We recommend contacting our service department and having the unit evaluated at the factory to verify this.

Need either further assistance or to order replacement parts? Contact us!

 

Check back next time as we will wrap up troubleshooting of ozone related issues by looking at photometer related issues with the 6103!   Subscribe above so you don't miss a thing!

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6103

Troubleshooting the Series 6100 - Part 6 - Ozone Without Command

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Tue, Apr 11, 2017 @ 11:14 AM

series-6100.jpg

Today, is the final part in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up, while Part 2 and Part 3 focused on what to do if you are seeing issues with flow. Part 4 looked at what to do when you were not getting any ozone regardless of the command. Part 5 look at a variety of ozone issues including drifting and unstable ozone. We also looked at what to do when you are getting high ozone in response to any command.

Today, we will look at how to troubleshoot the presence of ozone in the ABSENCE of a command.

Like Part 5, this focuses on the S6100, which have an ozone generator but not a photometer. We will finish the series by returning to ozone troubleshooting in a 6103.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service department!

 

Ozone is Present In the Absence of a Command

  1. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  2. Make sure all ozone calibration data and ADCs 11, 13 and 15 (found in the SYSTEM mode) are valid and consistent with the last calibration.
  3. If the data is all accurate, make sure that the zero potentiometer (R46) is adjusted so that the voltage at TP2 on PC410 is between 80 and 100 mV with a zero ozone command. Note: adjustments to this potentiometer will affect calibration. If this adjustment is set incorrectly (to low), it can cause the ozone lamp to light with no command. PC410 R46.jpg
  4. Ensure that the command voltage at TP4 on PC410 is zero. If it is not, the lamp drive circuit or photo detector circuit on the PC410 may be bad and we would suggest a replacement of the PC410. The ozone would then need to be recalibrated, so we recommend this be done in the factory. You can contact our service department for assistance.

 PC410 TP4.jpg

 

Need either further assistance or to order replacement parts? Contact us!

 

We hope you have found this guide to troubleshooting a Series 6100. Check back next time as we discuss how to troubleshoot ozone related issues with a 6103!                  

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6100

Troubleshooting the Series 6100 - Part 5 - Ozone Issues

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Thu, Apr 06, 2017 @ 09:33 AM

series-6100.jpg

Today, is Part 5 in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up, while Part 2 and Part 3 focused on what to do if you are seeing issues with flow. Part 4 looked at what to do when you were not getting any ozone regardless of the command.

Today, we will look at how to troubleshoot drifting ozone, unstable ozone or uncontrolled high levels of ozone to any command.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service department!

 

Ozone is Drifting

  1. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  2. Make sure all ozone calibration data and ADCs 11, 13 and 15 (found in the SYSTEM mode) is valid and consistent with the last calibration.
  3. Verify that the system has warmed up long enough with ozone commanded. Especially when a system is new, the generator may drift up to 30 minutes before stabilizing. If the system is not usedon a daily basis, drift will also be more common. We recommends that during the power up period, the system be run with ozone for 1 hour to help condition the plumbing and burn in the lamp. 
  4. If you are still seeing drift after warm up, it is important to make sure that the ozone block temperature is stable. A drifting block temperature will cause the ozone to drift. The ozone block temperature should be stable between 48 and 51 degrees C and can be monitored on TP15 (yellow) on PC410 (see below). The voltage should be between 4.8 and 5.1 VDC. PC410 TP15.jpg
  5. Make sure that the ozone command and ozone pressure are not drifting. This is checked on TP4 and TP17on PC410.  TP17 (green TP indicated by the red arrow) is the ozone pressure reading, and TP 4 (blue TP just below and to the right of TP17) is the ozone command. PC410 TP17.jpg
  6. If drift is consistent despite burn in and the above factors being stable, replace the ozone lamp.
  7. Although very uncommon, if a new lamp does not correct the drift either, if the optics have become contaminated by external contaminate (EX. Oil from compressor system), you may need to replace the ozone generator.Contact us for additional assistance, as a new ozone generator will require system recalibration.

Ozone is Unstable

  1. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  2. Make sure all ozone calibration data and ADCs 11, 13 and 15 (found in the SYSTEM mode) is valid and consistent with the last calibration.
  3. As outlined above in step 4 and 5, make sure you block temperature and pressure are stable.
  4. If all data is accurate and your temperature and pressure are stable, we recommend replacing the lamp.
  5. In rare occasions, if a new lamp does not correct the issue, a new PC410 is required. We recommend contacting our service department and having the unit evaluated at the factory to verify this.

Ozone is High and Uncontrolled Regardless of Command

  1. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  2. Make sure all ozone calibration data (found in the SYSTEM mode) is valid and consistent with the last calibration.
  3. If the data is all accurate, the problem is almost always the PC410 photo detector circuit has failed. The PC410 should be replaced. The ozone would then need to be recalibrated, so we recommend this be done in the factory. You can contact our service department for assistance.

 

We recommend contacting our service department and having the unit evaluated at the factory to verify this.

Need either further assistance or to order replacement parts? Contact us!

 

Check back next time as we will wrap up troubleshooting of ozone related issues with the 6100 and will discuss how to troubleshoot these same issues with a 6103!                  

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6100

Troubleshooting the Series 6100 and 6103 - Part 4 - No Ozone Upon Command

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Fri, Feb 17, 2017 @ 09:35 AM

series-6100.jpg

Today, is Part 4 in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100 and 6103. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up, while Part 2 and Part 3 focused on what to do if you are seeing issues with flow.

Today, we will look at how to troubleshoot ozone related issues, starting with what to do if you are requesting ozone and not getting any. This is where the Series 6100 and 6103 troubleshooting begins to differ between the units. See the notes below if troubleshooting a 6103.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service department!

 

No Ozone Regardless of Command

Note for Series 6103: Try verifying the ozone problem with an external source to isolate the problem either to the ozone generator or photometer. If determining an ozone problem using the internal photometer, also refer to the photometer problem section of the manual. Once we have a guide for this problem, the link will be added here.
  1. NEVER unplug the lamp while the unit is powered on. This can damage the circuitry. Remove the ozone generator cover to access the ozone generator PC410 board.
  2. Make sure all ozone calibration data (found in the SYSTEM mode) is valid and consistent with the last calibration.ozone generator 410.jpg
  3. For all ozone related issues, the next step is to check the steady state test points values on the PC410, TP10 (+15V), TP11 (-15V) and TP13 (+24V) using TP14 as the analog ground. In the image below, the ground is noted by the black arrow and the other test points by red arrows. These voltages are routed from the power supply to the PC412 to the PC410. So, if there is an issue with the voltage on the PC410, measure the respective TP on the PC412 (see Part 1 of our series).ozone generator 410 tp.jpg
    1. Assuming these numbers look good, while commanding ozone, you will next check the command test point for the ozone generator, TP4 on the PC410. This is noted by the blue arrow in the above image. It is a blue TP adjacent to the gain pots. The value depends on several factors, but should measure above 1 VDC.
    2. If the command voltage is not present, try a higher ozone command to be sure the command is not too low.
    3. If the command voltage and all steady state voltages are good, the problem may either be with the circuitry of the PC410 or the ozone lamp. If you have a spare lamp, you can replace the lamp to see if this corrects the issue. Be sure to only power on the unit when a lamp is plugged into the board. Contact us for additional assistance or to order replacement parts.

If you have verified these factors are all correct, and need further assistance, Contact us.

 

Check back next time as we look at troubleshooting of other ozone related issues!                  

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6100, troubleshooting6103

Troubleshooting the Series 6100 and 6103 - Part 3 - Unstable or Saturated Flow

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Wed, Feb 15, 2017 @ 10:35 AM

series-6100.jpg


Today, is Part 3 in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100 and 6103. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up, while Part 2 focused on what to do if you are seeing no or low flow from our MFCs.

Today, we will look at how to troubleshoot high or saturated flow as well as unstable blends or flow.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service department!

 

Unstable blends or flow from one or more MFC

  1. Begin by making sure your gas is hooked up to the correct input port/s. Check and adjust input pressures and verify they are stable. Although the MFC can adjsut for slow changing pressure, it cannot respond to pressure fluctuations that occur with less than ~ 10 sec cycle.
    1. In Flow mode, request the span of the MFC (100% point).Measure the response test point on the PC412. This will be TP2, TP4 or TP6 (white TPs for MFC1-MFC3 from top to bottom in the red circled area above) using TP8 as your ground. The response voltage should be stable.
    2. If the response voltage is changing at the same rate as the instability of the blend, verify the stability of the input pressure. Although the MFC can adjsut for slow changing pressure, it cannot respond to pressure fluctuations that occur with less than ~ 10 sec cycle.PC412 FLOW TP.jpg
  2. Once you have confirmed your input is correct, if the problem continues,remove all output connections to the system and try again. This will insure that the problem is not related to something downstream.
  3. Now that you have eliminated issues with the processing as well as at the input and output, you should check the power. Check out Part 1 of our series on the details of this testing. In addition to those test points,TP9(+5A), TP10(-5), TP11(-12) and TP12(+12) should be checked (the blue circle below). These steady state VDCs are used by the MFC ADC and DAC.          
  4. If you have verified these factors are all correct, most likely the issue is with the MFC itself. Contact us for help with the replacement or repair of the MFC.                   

 

Flow Rate Saturated Regardless of Command

  1. Normally, this indicates an issue with the MFC itself. We recommend verifying the voltages on the PC412, as outlined here.
  2. Contact us for help with the replacement or repair of the MFC or power supply.  

 

As always, we are here to answer any questions or concerns!

Next time we will cover what to do if you are not getting any ozone regardless of the command. Subscribe to the blog (look up top on the right) so you don't miss a thing!

 

 

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6100, troubleshooting6103

Troubleshooting the Series 6100 and 6103- Part 2- Lack of Flow

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Thu, Feb 02, 2017 @ 02:30 PM

series-6100.jpg

Today, is Part 2 in our series on some of the common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100. The full user and service manuals can be found here.

Part 1 looked at what to do if your display does not come up. Today we will focus on your flow and MFCs.

As with Part 1, these issues are dealt with in the same manner with a Series 6100 and a Series 6103.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

 

Note: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service department!

 

Zero or low flow from one or more MFC

  1. Begin by making sure your gas is hooked up to the correct input port/s. Check and adjust input pressures if necessary.  Nominal pressure is 25 PSIG. Tube size for MFC1 should be ¼” O.D. minimum, 1/8” minimum for MFC2.
  2. Once you have confirmed your input is correct, if the problem continues,remove all output connections to the system and try again. This will insure that the problem is not back pressure related.
  3.  Try running the MFC in the CALIBRATE MFC mode to see if the problem exists there as well.  This will insure that the problem is not related to software processing if it does not run in this mode either.
  4. Now that you have eliminated issues with the processing as well as at the input and output, you should check the power. Check out Part 1 of our series on the details of this testing. In addition to those test points,TP9(+5A), TP10(-5), TP11(-12) and TP12(+12) should be checked (the blue circle below). These steady state VDCs are used by the MFC ADC and DAC.                              PC412 FLOW TP.jpg
  5. Assuming your power is not the issue, we now will look at the MFC itself. 
    1. In Flow mode, request the span of the MFC (100% point).Measure the command voltage to the MFC on the PC412 (see above). This will be TP1, TP3 or TP5 (blue TPs from top to bottom in the red circled area) depending on if you are monitoring MFC1, MFC2 or MFC3 respectively. TP8 is the brown analog ground test point for negative (black) meter lead, shown in the squared area above.
    2. If your command voltage is approximately +5V, measure corresponding MFC response test point on the PC412. This will be TP2, TP4 or TP6 (white TPs for MFC1-MFC3 from top to bottom in the red circled area above). Again, use TP8 as your ground. The response voltage should be very close to the command voltage.

    3. If the command and response voltage are both okay, it might be that the actual flow is just being displayed. This could be caused by corrupt memory, which can often be resolved by removing the memory chip, waiting a minute or two, reinstalling and the initializing the unit.
    4. If the command is good but response voltage is low or 0, there may either be a problem with the MFC cable or the MFC. Try swapping the MFC cable and repeating the test. If these things fail to fix the problem, the issue is most likely the MFC itself. You should contact us for assistance in getting this resolved.

    5. If your command voltage is NOT +5V, check the the MFC size setup. Press in the keys in this order to reasch the service menu: 9 F1 F2 F3 Menu. Arrow down to "Set MFC Size" and verify this matches your unit setup. You should also verify the calibration data for the MFC in the system mode to ensure that the values have not been changed since the last calibration. Environics sends a hardcopy of all data for reference. Contact us if you need them resent.
    6. If your command voltage is NOT +5V and you setup is correct, you most likely have an issue in the A194 assembly which contains the PC401 and PC412. You should contact us for assistance in getting this resolved.

 

As always, we are here to answer any questions or concerns!

Next time we will cover what to do if you are getting unstable flow from one or more of your MFCs! Subscribe to the blog (look up and on the right) so you don't miss a thing!

 

 

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6100, troubleshooting6103

Troubleshooting the Series 6100 and 6103 - Part 1- Display Issues

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Wed, Feb 01, 2017 @ 10:30 AM

series-6100.jpgThe Environics Series 6100 Multi-gas Calibrator was designed to be the finest instrument available for producing highly precise mixtures of ozone and other gases. The Series 6100 automatically performs zero, precision, span and multi-point calibrations using NO, NO2, SO2, CO, 03, hydrocarbons and other gases of interest. The 6100 meets all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requirements. The system consists of a single chassis supporting 2 thermal mass flow controllers (optional third MFC available) , an ozone generation module, a mixing zone, a reaction chamber for gas phase titration, and control electronics. Commands are entered from the front panel and displayed on a backlit 4 line by 20 character liquid crystal display. The instrument may also be remotely operated using contact closures or the RS-232 serial data interface, both are standard in the Series 6100.

S6100 ozone.jpg

The Series 6103 consists of a single chassis supporting up to 3 thermal mass flow controllers, an ozone generation module, photometer, glass output manifold, mixing chamber, a reaction chamber for gas phase titration, and control electronics.The internal ultra-violet (UV) based ozone generator is temperature controlled and includes a precision photo-optical feedback circuit to compensate for lamp aging effects providing stable ozone generation. The ozone generator is factory calibrated using a NIST traceable photometer standard

6103 overhead.jpg

Over the next weeks, we are going to review some common questions on troubleshooting the Series 6100 and 6103. The full user and service manuals can be found here. Some of these guides, such as today's, will apply to both units while others are specific to the Series 6100 or Series 6103. We will clearly note when this is the case.

Let us know if you have a specific issue you'd like us to cover!

Note: Customers who work on their units accept the risks of working on machinery and are responsible for taking all proper safety precautions. If in doubt, contact our service department!

 

System display does not come up - Series 6100 and 6103

  1. Check to see if the switch is illuminated. If it IS NOT illuminated,check your power cord connection and the power source voltage. We suggest the use of a power conditioner. You should also check fuses in power entry moduleon rear panel and replace if necessary.
  2. If the switch IS illuminated,
    1. Check that all cables and connections are secure. A loose cable to the PC406 can cause the display to not come up.
    2. Once you verify the cables are making good connection, you will want to check the steady state test points located on the PC412-1D. This is the rear board of the sandwiched boards on the right side of the chassis.
    3. Check TP14, (-15VDC), TP15 (+15VDC), TP16 (+5VDC) (all using TP17 for GND) and TP19 (+24VDC) (using TP18 for GND). These are all labeled within the circled area on the PC412.

      PC412 TP.jpg
    4. If any of these are absent, check the power supply voltages with the power cable disconnected from PC412 using the below diagram as your guide.

      power cable.jpg
    5. An absence of any of these power supply voltages suggests the need for a new power supply.

    6. If all power supply voltages are present, the issue is within another PCB or component and these will need further testing to identify the problem.

Next time we will cover what to do if you are getting low or no flow from one or more of your MFCs! Subscribe to the blog (look up and on the right) so you don't miss a thing!

 

 

Tags: Service, Troubleshooting, S6000, troubleshooting6100, troubleshooting6103

"Ozone Season"

Posted by Rachel Stansel on Thu, Mar 13, 2014 @ 01:04 PM

We are quickly approaching what is commonly known as "ozone season" in the US. This is the time of year where agencies shift into high gear of monitor, record and report the levels of ozone as well as other pollutants. 

gas calibrationMany of our customers have been getting their ambient monitor calibration systems calibrated and tuned-up to be ready to begin the season.  If you still need your system serviced for this ozone season, please let us know ASAP as the calendar is filling fast! 

 


Check out this post from last year regarding the EPA’s new ozone reporting site.  It’s a great way to check the conditions in your area.

 

On June 30, 2013, the US Environmental Protection Agency released a revision to the Air Emissions Reporting Rule (AERR). The rule states the goal of the revisions is to "reduce reporting burden for state, local and tribal agencies, improve consistency and clarity with other rules, and better reflect current inventory technologies and practices."

The AERR was first published in 2008 as a replacement to the previous Consolidated Emissions Reporting Rule (CERR), which was published in 2002.  Both regulations were created to improve the ability of the EPA to gather emissions data on a national level.  The data is used to create a national inventory of air pollutant emissions. You can see this data in use and search for the conditions in your area at the EPA's MY Environment.

air quality ambient monitor

The improved AERR aims to grant states more flexibility on how to collect and report this emissions data.  These increased permissions give the state programs the ability to operate more efficiently.  To find out more visit the EPA's AERR page.

Tags: ozone, air quality, ozone generator, Ambient Air calibration, ambient air calibrator, Zero Air, zero air generator, gas dilution, calibration, Service